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2.     Reporting Requirements

 

2.1     Books of Accounts and Statutory Records

Companies must keep books and follow accounting procedures as specified in the Civil and Commercial Code, the Revenue Code, and the Accounts Act. Documents may be prepared in any language, provided that a Thai translation is attached. All accounting entries should be written in ink, typewritten, or printed. Specifically, Section 12 of the Accounts Act of 2000 provides rules on how accounts should be maintained:

 

“In keeping accounts, the person with the duty to keep accounts must hand over the documents required for making accounting entries to the bookkeeper correctly and completely, in order that the accounts so kept may show the results of operations, financial position according to facts and accounting standards.”

 

2.2     Accounting Period

An accounting period must be 12 months. Unless the Articles of Association state otherwise, a newly established company should close accounts within 12 months of its registration. Thereafter, the accounts should be closed every 12 months. If a company wishes to change its accounting period, it must obtain written approval from the Director-General of the Revenue Department.

 

2.3     Reporting Requirements

All juristic companies, partnerships, branches of foreign companies, and joint ventures are required to prepare financial statements for each accounting period. The financial statement must be audited by and subjected to the opinion of a certified auditor, with the exception of the financial statement of a registered partnership established under Thai law, whose total capital, assets, and income are not more than that prescribed in Ministerial Regulations. The performance record is to be certified by the company’s auditor, approved by shareholders, and filed with the Commercial Registration Department of the MOC and with the Revenue Department of the Ministry of Finance (MOF).

 

For a private limited company, the director is responsible for arranging the annual meeting of shareholders to approve the company’s audited financial statement within 4 months at the end of the fiscal year, and filing the audited statement and supporting documents, including a list of shareholders on the date of the meeting, to the Registrar no later than 1 month after the date of the shareholder meeting.

 

For a foreign company, i.e. branch office, representative office or regional office, and excluding joint ventures, the Manager of the branch office must submit a copy of the financial statement to the Registrar no later than 150 days after the end of the fiscal year. Approval of the shareholder meeting is not required.

 

For a public limited company, the director is responsible for arranging the annual meeting of shareholders to approve the audited financial statements of a company within 4 months at the end of the fiscal year. A copy of the audited financial statement and annual report, together with a copy of the minutes of the shareholder meeting approving the financial statement, should be certified by the director and submitted to the Registrar, along with a list of shareholders on the date of the meeting, no later than 1 month after approval at the shareholder’s meeting. In addition, the company is required to publish the balance sheet for public information in a newspaper for a period of at least 1 day within 1 month of the date it was approved at the shareholder’s meeting.

 

2.4     Accounting Principles

In general, the basic accounting principles practiced in the United States are accepted in Thailand, as are accounting methods and conventions sanctioned by law. The Institute of Certified Accountants and Auditors of Thailand is the authoritative group promoting the application of generally accepted accounting principles.

 

Any accounting method adopted by a company must be used consistently and may be changed only with approval of the Revenue Department. Certain accounting practices of note include:

 

Depreciation: The Revenue Code permits the use of varying depreciation rates according to the nature of the asset, which has the effect of depreciating the asset over a period that may be shorter than its estimated useful life. These maximum depreciation rates are not mandatory. A company may use a lower rate that approximates the estimated useful life of the asset. If a lower rate is used in the books of the accounts, the same rate must be used in the income tax return.

 

Accounting for Pension Plans: Contributions to a pension or provident fund are not deductible for tax purposes unless they are actually paid out to the employees, or if the fund is approved by the Revenue Department and managed by a licensed fund manager.

 

Consolidation: Local companies with either foreign or local subsidiaries are not required to consolidate their financial statements for tax and other government reporting purposes, except for listed companies, which must submit consolidated financial statements to the Securities and Exchange Commission of Thailand .

 

Statutory Reserve: A statutory reserve of at least 5% of annual net profit arising from the business must be appropriated by the company at each distribution of dividends until the reserve reaches at least 10% of the company's authorized capital.

 

Stock Dividends: Stock dividends are taxable as ordinary dividends and may be declared only if there is an approved increase in authorized capital. The law requires the authorized capital to be subscribed in full by the shareholders.

 

2.5     Auditing Requirements and Standards

Audited financial statements of juristic entities (i.e. a limited company, registered partnership, branch, representative office, regional office of a foreign corporation, or joint venture) must be certified by an authorized auditor and be submitted to the Revenue Department and to the Commercial Registrar for each accounting year.

 

However, for a registered partnership with registered capital of less than five million baht, total revenue of no more than 30 million baht, and total assets of no more than 30 million baht, financial statement does not need to be certified by an authorized auditor.

 

Auditing practices conforming to international standards are, for the most part, recognized and practiced by authorized auditors in Thailand.

 

Reviewed: November 2015

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